Double Victory: Minorities and Women During World War II
Teaser Image

Stratemeyer, George Edward (1890–1969)

U.S. Army Air Forces general. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, on 24 November 1890, George Stratemeyer graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1915. On graduation, he was commissioned in the infantry and served along the Mexican border. In 1916, however, Stratemeyer transferred to the Signal Corps and became an aviator, completing flight training in 1917 at Rockwell Field in San Diego, California.

During World War I, Stratemeyer commanded the School of Military Aeronautics at Ohio State University. He was then chief test pilot at Kelly Field, Texas, and Chanute Field, Illinois. He transferred to the Army Air Service in 1920. In 1921, he took command of Chanute Field, Illinois. Stratemeyer was next assigned to Hawaii and then taught tactics at West Point from 1924 to 1929. He graduated from the Air Corps Tactical School at Langley Field, Virginia, in 1930 and the Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, in 1932, where he then taught for several years. Promoted to lieutenant colonel, he commanded the 7th Bombardment Group at Hamilton Field, California, from 1936 to 1938. He graduated from the Army War College in 1939 and then commanded the Southeast Air Corps Training Center, Maxwell Field, Alabama. He next served as chief of the Air Staff at Washington, D.C., and was promoted to major general in 1942.

In August 1943, Stratemayer arrived in India to take command of U.S. Army Air Forces in the China-Burma-India Theater, where his forces performed important work in the resupply of Chinese troops fighting the Japanese. President Franklin D. Roosevelt approved Stratemeyer's plan to bomb Japanese forces from a base in India and others in China. Stratemeyer next headed the Eastern Air Command (a joint U.S.-British air organization) and Army Air Forces in China with headquarters in Chongqing (Chungking). His units helped relocate some 200,000 Chinese troops and 5,000 horses from eastern to western China. Stratemeyer was promoted to lieutenant general in 1945.

From February 1946 to April 1949, Stratemeyer led the new Air Defense Command. A forceful advocate of an expanded air force, he promoted the establishment of an air force academy. He then took command of the Far East Air Force. When the United States entered the Korean War, Stratemeyer's meager air assets attacked the invading North Korean forces and helped prevent their victory. Throughout, his units maintained air supremacy over Korea.

A massive heart attack in May 1951 cut short Stratemeyer's career, and he retired in January 1952. He died in Orlando, Florida, on 9 August 1969.

Uzal W. Ent and Spencer C. Tucker


Further Reading
Futrell, Robert F. The United States Air Force in Korea, 1950–1953. Rev. ed. Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History, U.S. Air Force, 1983.; Romanus, Charles S., and Riley Sunderland. The United States Army in World War II: China-Burma-India Theater: Stilwell's Command Problems. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1956.; Romanus, Charles S., and Riley Sunderland. The United States Army in World War II: China-Burma-India Theater: Time Runs Out in CBI. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1959.
 

©2011 ABC-CLIO. All rights reserved.

  About the Author/Editor
  Introduction
  Essays
  A
  B
  C
  D
  E
  F
  G
  H
  I
  J
  K
  L
  M
  N
  O
  P
  Q
  R
  S
  T
  U
  V
  W
  X
  Y
  Z
  Documents Prior to 1938
  1939 Documents
  1940 Documents
  1941 Documents
  1942 Documents
  1943 Documents
  1944 Documents
  1945 Documents
  Images
ABC-cLIO Footer