Double Victory: Minorities and Women During World War II
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Khozin, Mikhail Semenovich (1896–1979)

Soviet army general and commander of the Leningrad Front in 1941. Born in the village of Skachikha, Russia, on 22 October 1896, Mikhail Khozin served as a junior officer in the Russian army during World War I before joining the Red Army and the Communist Party in 1918. He held a variety of assignments, and by the time of the German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, Khozin, as a lieutenant general, headed the Frunze Military Academy.

In October 1941, Khozin took command of the Leningrad Front. Stalin demoted him after he promised but failed to save General Andrei Vlasov's Second Shock Army. Between June and October 1942, Khozin headed Thirty-Third Army. He briefly commanded Twentieth Army (from December 1942 to January 1943). Khozin died in Moscow on 27 February 1979.

Spencer C. Tucker


Further Reading
Seaton, Albert, and Joan Seaton. The Soviet Army: 1918 to the Present. New York: New American Library, 1987.
 

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